Search Results for: forensics

Could CrowdOptic Be Used For Disaster Response?

Crowds—rather than sole individuals—are increasingly bearing witness to disasters large and small. Instagram users, for example, snapped 800,000 #Sandy pictures during the hurricane last year. One way to make sense of this vast volume and velocity of multimedia content—Big Data—during … Continue reading

Crowdsourcing Critical Thinking to Verify Social Media During Crises

My colleagues and I at QCRI and the Masdar Institute will be launching Verily in the near future. The project has already received quite a bit of media coverage—particularly after the Boston marathon bombings. So here’s an update. While major … Continue reading

Humanitarianism in the Network Age: Groundbreaking Study

My colleagues at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) have just published a groundbreaking must-read study on Humanitarianism in the Network Age; an important and forward-thinking policy document on humanitarian technology and innovation. The report “imagines how … Continue reading

Using Crowdsourcing to Counter the Spread of False Rumors on Social Media During Crises

My new colleague Professor Yasuaki Sakamoto at the Stevens Institute of Tech-nology (SIT) has been carrying out intriguing research on the spread of rumors via social media, particularly on Twitter and during crises. In his latest research, “Toward a Social-Technological System that … Continue reading

Keynote: Next Generation Humanitarian Technology

I’m excited to be giving the Keynote address at the Social Media and Response Management Interface Event (SMARMIE 2013) in New York this morning. A big thank you to the principal driver behind this important event, Chuck Frank, for kindly … Continue reading

Comparing the Quality of Crisis Tweets Versus 911 Emergency Calls

In 2010, I published this blog post entitled “Calling 911: What Humanitarians Can Learn from 50 Years of Crowdsourcing.” Since then, humanitarian colleagues have become increasingly open to the use of crowdsourcing as a methodology to  both collect and process … Continue reading

Debating the Value of Tweets For Disaster Response (Intelligently)

With every new tweeted disaster comes the same old question: what is the added value of tweets for disaster response? Only a handful of data-driven studies actually bother to move the debate beyond anecdotes. It is thus high time that a meta-level … Continue reading

Automatically Ranking the Credibility of Tweets During Major Events

In their study, “Credibility Ranking of Tweets during High Impact Events,” authors Aditi Gupta and Ponnurangam Kumaraguru “analyzed the credibility of information in tweets corresponding to fourteen high impact news events of 2011 around the globe.” According to their analysis, “30% of … Continue reading

Predicting the Credibility of Disaster Tweets Automatically

“Predicting Information Credibility in Time-Sensitive Social Media” is one of this year’s most interesting and important studies on “information forensics”. The analysis, co-authored by my QCRI colleague ChaTo Castello, will be published in Internet Research and should be required reading for anyone interested … Continue reading

Rapidly Verifying the Credibility of Information Sources on Twitter

One of the advantages of working at QCRI is that I’m regularly exposed to peer-reviewed papers presented at top computing conferences. This is how I came across an initiative called “Seriously Rapid Source Review” or SRSR. As many iRevolution readers … Continue reading