Tag Archives: aid

Communicating with Disaster Affected Communities (CDAC)

Communication is Aid: Curated tweets and commentary from the CDAC Network’s Media and Technology Fair, London 2012. My commentary in blue. This is the first time I’ve used Storify to curate content. (I bumped into the co-founder of the platform at SXSW which reminded me I really needed to get in on the action).

  1. Sha

    re
    “After the Japan earthquake, >20% of ALL web queries issued were on tsunamis.” @spangledrongo #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 08:53:43
  2. Would be great to see how this type of search data compares to data from Tweets. Take this analysis of tweets following the earthquake in Chile, for example.
  3. Share
    RT @UNFPA: Professional systems are being replaced by consumer tools says @Google Crisis Response #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 08:48:58
  4. And as a result, crisis-affected communities are increasingly becoming digital as I note in this blog post.
  5. Share
    Closed systems closed data will be left behind and unused:crisis response is social and collaboration is empowering @CDACNetwork #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 08:49:58
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    RT @catherinedem: Crisis response is #social – online social collaboration spikes during and after disaster @spangledrongo #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 08:54:03
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    “It is essential to have authoritative content” Nigel Snoad at @CDACNetwork’s Media & Tech Fair #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 08:58:28
  8. Does this mean that all user-generated content should be ignored because said content does not necessarily come from a known and authoritative source? Who decides what is authoritative?
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    we don’t empower communities by giving them info,they empower themselves by giving us info that we can act on-@komunikasikan #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 11:31:02
  10. What if this information is not authoritative because it does not come from official sources?
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    RT @ushahidi: “In a crisis, the mobile internet stays most resilient, even more than SMS.” #commisaid Nigel Snoad

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 09:02:53
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    RT @jqg: Empower local communities to generate their own tools and figure out their own solutions #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 09:10:43
  13. See this blog post on Democratizing ICT for Development Using DIY Innovation and Open Data.
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    Through #Mission4636 SMS system, radio presenter @carelpedre was able to communicate directly with affected people in Haiti #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 12:20:14
  15. This is rather interesting, I hadn’t realized that radio stations in Haiti actively used the information from the Ushahidi Haiti 4636 project.
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    Fascinating talk with @carelpedre- many of #Haiti ‘s pre-earthquake twitter users came from @juno7′s lottery push notifications #Commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 11:11:43
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    More about @Carelpedre using 4636 project after #Haiti earthquake bit.ly/plgzXJ #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 12:17:52
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    Internews: Innovation comes within, info comes from within, people will find ways to communicate no matter what #commisaid @CDACNetwork

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 09:26:25
  19. So best of luck to those who wish to regulate this space! As my colleague Tim McNamara has noted “Crisis mapping is not simply a technological shift, it is also a process of rapid decentralisation of power. With extremely low barriers to entry, many new entrants are appearing in the fields of emergency and disaster response. They are ignoring the traditional hierarchies, because the new entrants perceive that there is something that they can do which benefits others.”
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    @souktel: “be simple, be creative and learn from the community around you” #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 10:57:09
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    Tools shouldn’t own data. RT @whiteafrican: “It’s not about the platform being open, it’s about the data being open”- @jcrowley #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 11:56:08
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    Humanitarians have to get their heads around media and tech or risk being left behind #m4d #media #tech #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 11:56:58
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    Cutting edge is to get the #crowd & the #algorithm to filter each other in filtering massive overload of information in a crisis #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 12:01:17
  24. As Robert Kirkpatrick likes to say, “Use the hunch of the expert, machine algorithms and the wisdom of the crowd.”
  25. Share
    “How long until the disaster affected communities start analyzing the aid agencies?” #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 12:14:50
  26. Yes! Sousveillance meets analysis of big data on the humanitarian sector.
  27. Share
    Why is it such a big deal, for the humanitarian industry to get feedback from a community? Companies have done it for decades. #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 12:17:31
  28. Some of my thoughts on what the humanitarian community can learn from the private sector vis-a-vis customer support.
  29. Share
    People who are not traditional humanitarian actors are taking on humanitarian roles, driven by the democratisation of technology #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 13:00:12
  30. Indeed, not only are disaster-affected communities increasingly digital, so are global volunteer networks like the Standby Volunteer Task Force (SBTF).
  31. Share
    Technology is shifting the power balance – it’s helping local communities to organise their own responses to disasters #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 13:11:18
  32. Indeed, as a result of these mobile technologies, affected populations are increasingly able to source, share and generate a vast amount of information, which is completely transforming disaster response. More on this here.
  33. Share
    Like Paul Currion’s analogy – humanitarian sector risks obsolescence in the same way the record industry did. Watch out? #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 13:17:36
  34. Share


    Thu, Mar 22 2012 14:57:13
  35. One of my favorite books, The Starfish and the Spider: The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations, has an excellent case study on the music industry. The above picture is taken from that chapter and charts the history of the industry from the perspective of hierarchies vs networks. I’ve argued a couple years ago that the same dynamic is taking place within humanitarian response. See this blog post on Disaster Relief 2.0: Toward a Multipolar System.
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    A thousand flowers can bloom beautifully IF common data standards allow sharing. Right now no natural selection improving quality #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 13:43:19
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    @GSMADisasterRes :free phone numbers &short codes r not silver bullets 4 meaningful communication w/disaster affected communities #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 13:58:44
  38. Share
    Scale horizontally, not vertically. The end of command and control?! #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 14:07:54
  39. Share
    RT @reeniac: what now? communities have the solution, we need to listen. start by including them in the discussions – Dr Jamilah #commisaid

    Thu, Mar 22 2012 14:14:55

Crisis Mapping Climate Change, Conflict and Aid in Africa

I recently gave a guest lecture at the University of Texas, Austin, and finally had the opportunity to catch up with my colleague Josh Busby who has been working on a promising crisis mapping project as part of the university’s Climate Change and African Political Stability Program (CCAPS).

Josh and team just released the pilot version of its dynamic mapping tool, which aims to provide the most comprehensive view yet of climate change and security in Africa. The platform, developed in partnership with AidData, enables users to “visualize data on climate change vulnerability, conflict, and aid, and to analyze how these issues intersect in Africa.” The tool is powered by ESRI technology and allows researchers as well as policymakers to “select and layer any combination of CCAPS data onto one map to assess how myriad climate change impacts and responses intersect. For example, mapping conflict data over climate vulnera-bility data can assess how local conflict patterns could exacerbate climate-induced insecurity in a region. It also shows how conflict dynamics are changing over time and space.”

The platform provides hyper-local data on climate change and aid-funded interventions, which can provide important insights on how development assistance might (or might not) be reducing vulnerability. For example, aid projects funded by 27 donors in Malawi (i.e., aid flows) can be layered on top of the climate change vulnerability data to “discern whether adaptation aid is effectively targeting the regions where climate change poses the most significant risk to the sustainable development and political stability of a country.”

If this weren’t impressive enough, I was positively amazed when I learned from Josh and team that the conflict data they’re using, the Armed Conflict Location Event Data (ACLED), will be updated on a weekly basis as part of this project, which is absolutely stunning. Back in the day, ACLED was specifically coding historical data. A few years ago they closed the gap by updating some conflict data on a yearly basis. Now the temporal lag will just be one week. Note that the mapping tool already draws on the Social Conflict in Africa Database (SCAD).

This project is an important contribution to the field of crisis mapping and I look forward to following CCAPS’s progress closely over the next few months. I’m hoping that Josh will present this project at the 2012 International Crisis Mappers Conference (ICCM 2012) later this year.