Tag Archives: hashtags

Hashtag Analysis of #Westgate Crisis Tweets

In July 2013, my team and I at QCRI launched this dashboard to analyze hashtags used by Twitter users during crises. Our first case study, which is available here, focused on Hurricane Sandy. Since then, both the UN and Greenpeace have also made use of the dashboard to analyze crisis tweets.

QCRI_Dashboard

We just uploaded 700,000+ Westgate related tweets to the dashboard. The results are available here and also displayed above. The dashboard is still under development, so we very much welcome feedback on how to improve it for future analysis. You can upload your own tweets to the dashboard if you’d like to test drive the platform.

Bio

See also: Forensics Analysis of #Westgate Tweets (Link)

Analyzing Crisis Hashtags on Twitter (Updated)

Update: You can now upload your own tweets to the Crisis Hashtags Analysis Dashboard here

Hashtag footprints can be revealing. The map below, for example, displays the top 200 locations in the world with the most Twitter hashtags. The top 5 are Sao Paolo, London, Jakarta, Los Angeles and New York.

Hashtag map

A recent study (PDF) of 2 billion geo-tagged tweets and 27 million unique hashtags found that “hashtags are essentially a local phenomenon with long-tailed life spans.” The analysis also revealed that hashtags triggered by external events like disasters “spread faster than hashtags that originate purely within the Twitter network itself.” Like other metadata, hashtags can be  informative in and of themselves. For example, they can provide early warning signals of social tensions in Egypt, as demonstrated in this study. So might they also reveal interesting patterns during and after major disasters?

Tens of thousands of distinct crisis hashtags were posted to Twitter during Hurricane Sandy. While #Sandy and #hurricane featured most, thousands more were also used. For example: #SandyHelp, #rallyrelief, #NJgas, #NJopen, #NJpower, #staysafe, #sandypets, #restoretheshore, #noschool, #fail, etc. NJpower, for example, “helped keep track of the power situation throughout the state. Users and news outlets used this hashtag to inform residents where power outages were reported and gave areas updates as to when they could expect their power to come back” (1).

Sandy Hashtags

My colleagues and I at QCRI are studying crisis hashtags to better understand the variety of tags used during and in the immediate aftermath of major crises. Popular hashtags used during disasters often overshadow more hyperlocal ones making these less discoverable. Other challenges include the: “proliferation of hashtags that do not cross-pollinate and a lack of usability in the tools necessary for managing massive amounts of streaming information for participants who needed it” (2). To address these challenges and analyze crisis hashtags, we’ve just launched a Crisis Hashtags Analytics Dashboard. As displayed below, our first case study is Hurricane Sandy. We’ve uploaded about half-a-million tweets posted between October 27th to November 7th, 2012 to the dashboard.

QCRI_Dashboard

Users can visualize the frequency of tweets (orange line) and hashtags (green line) over time using different time-steps, ranging from 10 minute to 1 day intervals. They can also “zoom in” to capture more minute changes in the number of hashtags per time interval. (The dramatic drop on October 30th is due to a server crash. So if you have access to tweets posted during those hours, I’d be  grateful if you could share them with us).

Hashtag timeline

In the second part of the dashboard (displayed below), users can select any point on the graph to display the top “K” most frequent hashtags. The default value for K is 10 (e.g., top-10 most frequent hashtags) but users can change this by typing in a different number. In addition, the 10 least-frequent hashtags are displayed, as are the 10 “middle-most” hashtags. The top-10 newest hashtags posted during the selected time are also displayed as are the hashtags that have seen the largest increase in frequency. These latter two metrics, “New K” and “Top Increasing K”, may provide early warning signals during disasters. Indeed, the appearance of a new hashtag can reveal a new problem or need while a rapid increase in the frequency of some hashtags can denote the spread of a problem or need.

QCRI Dashboard 2

The third part of the dashboard allows users to visualize and compare the frequency of top hashtags over time. This feature is displayed in the screenshot below. Patterns that arise from diverging or converging hashtags may indicate important developments on the ground.

QCRI Dashboard 3

We’re only at the early stages of developing our hashtags analytics platform (above), but we hope the tool will provide insights during future disasters. For now, we’re simply experimenting and tinkering. So feel free to get in touch if you would like to collaborate and/or suggest some research questions.

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Acknowledgements: Many thanks to QCRI colleagues Ahmed Meheina and Sofiane Abbar for their work on developing the dashboard.

To Tweet or Not To Tweet During a Disaster?

Yes, only a small percentage of tweets generated during a disaster are directly relevant and informative for disaster response. No, this doesn’t mean we should dismiss Twitter as a source for timely, disaster-related information. Why? Because our efforts ought to focus on how that small percentage of informative tweets can be increased. What incentives or policies can be put in place? The following tweets by the Filipino government may shed some light.

Gov Twitter Pablo

The above tweet was posted three days before Typhoon Bopha (designated Pablo locally) made landfall in the Philippines. In the tweet below, the government directly and publicly encourages Filipinos to use the #PabloPH hashtag and to follow the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical & Astronomical Services Admin-istration (PAGASA) twitter feed, @dost_pagasa, which has over 400,000 follow-ers and also links to this official Facebook page.

Gov Twitter

The government’s official Twitter handle (@govph) is also retweeting tweets posted by The Presidential Communications Development and Strategic Plan-ning Office (@PCDCSO). This office is the “chief message-crafting body of the Office of the President.” In one such retweet (below), the office encourages those on Twitter to use different hashtags for different purposes (relief vs rescue). This mimics the use of official emergency numbers for different needs, e.g., police, fire, Ambulance, etc.

Twitter Pablo Gov

Given this kind of enlightened disaster response leadership, one would certainly expect that the quality of tweets received will be higher than without government endorsement. My team and I at QCRI are planning to analyze these tweets to de-termine whether or not this is the case. In the meantime, I expect we’ll see more examples of self-organized disaster response efforts using these hashtags, as per the earlier floods in August, which I blogged about here: Crowdsourcing Crisis Response following the Philippine Floods. This tech-savvy self-organization dynamic is important since the government itself may be unable to follow up on every tweeted request.

Launching a Library of Crisis Hashtags on Twitter

I recently posted the following question on the CrisisMappers list-serve: “Does anyone know whether a list of crisis hashtags exists?”

There are several reasons why such a hashtag list would be of added value to the CrisisMappers community and beyond. First, an analysis of Twitter hashtags used during crises over the past few years could be quite insightful; interesting new patterns may be evolving. Second, the resulting analysis could be used as a guide to find (and create) new hashtags when future crises unfold. Third, a library of hashtags would make it easier to collect historical datasets of crisis information shared on Twitter for the purposes of analysis & social computing research. To be sure, without this data, developing more sophisticated machine learning platforms like the Twitter Dashboard for the Humanitarian Cluster System would be serious challenge indeed.

After posting my question on CrisisMappers and Twitter, it was clear that no such library existed. So my colleague Sara Farmer launched a Google Spreadsheet to crowdsource an initial list. Since I was working on a similar list, I’ve created a combined spreadsheet which is available and editable here. Please do add any other crisis hashtags you may know about so we can make this the most comprehensive and up-to-date resource available to everyone. Thank you!

Whilst doing this research, I came across two potentially interesting and helpful hashtag websites: Hashonomy.com and Hashtags.org.