Tag Archives: SocialFlow

Big Data Philanthropy for Humanitarian Response

My colleague Robert Kirkpatrick from Global Pulse has been actively promoting the concept of “data philanthropy” within the context of development. Data philanthropy involves companies sharing proprietary datasets for social good. I believe we urgently need big (social) data philanthropy for humanitarian response as well. Disaster-affected communities are increasingly the source of big data, which they generate and share via social media platforms like twitter. Processing this data manually, however, is very time consuming and resource intensive. Indeed, large numbers of digital humanitarian volunteers are often needed to monitor and process user-generated content from disaster-affected communities in near real-time.

Meanwhile, companies like Crimson Hexagon, Geofeedia, NetBase, Netvibes, RecordedFuture and Social Flow are defining the cutting edge of automated methods for media monitoring and analysis. So why not set up a Big Data Philanthropy group for humanitarian response in partnership with the Digital Humanitarian Network? Call it Corporate Social Responsibility (CRS) for digital humanitarian response. These companies would benefit from the publicity of supporting such positive and highly visible efforts. They would also receive expert feedback on their tools.

This “Emergency Access Initiative” could be modeled along the lines of the International Charter whereby certain criteria vis-a-vis the disaster would need to be met before an activation request could be made to the Big Data Philanthropy group for humanitarian response. These companies would then provide a dedicated account to the Digital Humanitarian Network (DHNet). These accounts would be available for 72 hours only and also be monitored by said companies to ensure they aren’t being abused. We would simply need to  have relevant members of the DHNet trained on these platforms and draft the appropriate protocols, data privacy measures and MoUs.

I’ve had preliminary conversations with humanitarian colleagues from the United Nations and DHnet who confirm that “this type of collaboration would be see very positively from the coordination area within the traditional humanitarian sector.” On the business development end, this setup would enable companies to get their foot in the door of the humanitarian sector—a multi-billion dollar industry. Members of the DHNet are early adopters of humanitarian technology and are ideally placed to demonstrate the added value of these platforms since they regularly partner with large humanitarian organizations. Indeed, DHNet operates as a partnership model. This would enable humanitarian professionals to learn about new Big Data tools, see them in action and, possibly, purchase full licenses for their organizations. In sum, data philanthropy is good for business.

I have colleagues at most of the companies listed above and thus plan to actively pursue this idea further. In the meantime, I’d be very grateful for any feedback and suggestions, particularly on the suggested protocols and MoUs. So I’ve set up this open and editable Google Doc for feedback.

Big thanks to the team at the Disaster Information Management Research Center (DIMRC) for planting the seeds of this idea during our recent meeting. Check out their very neat Emergency Access Initiative.